IMCP: The IMC Presentation


Dr. Randall Hansen's Integrated Marketing Communications Program (IMCP)

Your presentation must be informative and lively. It must strike the delicate balance of providing enough details without putting people to sleep. Tell a story and generate excitement!


Planning the Presentation

Most of the effectiveness of your presentation -- up to 90 percent, say some experts -- is determined BEFORE you give it. Here are some steps to guide you through the planning process.

Tell a Single Story

Before you begin thinking about how to arrange the pieces of your presentation, envision the larger story you want to tell. Unlike the IMC Report, which covers all the details -- the trees -- your presentation needs to focus on how the details fit together -- the forest.

Design it to be a single, unified whole rather than a choppy series of department reports. The audience should be able to see how important market research results led you to develop your strategy -- and how your event and associated advertising and public relations tactics will bear that out.

Most groups divide their presentations among several speakers. This can generate energy and show the audience the power of teamwork. But group presentations also require careful coordination. All the parts need to be developed together so they fit into the unified story you are telling -- and they need to be connected with transitions between speakers.

Generate Excitement

Once you know how you're going to organize and illustrate your presentation, ask yourselves: "Is this going to make the audience feel as enthusiastic as we do about our idea?"

Each speaker's energetic delivery helps keep the audience's excitement up, but plan to keep interest high in other ways as well. Consider making a video to illustrate a point, using lively music, experimenting with lighting, varying your illustrations and visuals, finding interesting props. Interact with the audience -- anything to make your clients' experience of your event even more direct.

All you need to remember is to be professional at all times.

Some Tips for Heightening Audience Interest

  • Use the client (brand and dealership) name frequently. Studies show that individuals respond strongly to their own name. Specific use of your client's name will strengthen your presentation.
  • Save a surprise for the end of the presentation -- something to make it memorable. Consider a creative setup. One group emulated a TV game show. Others have had one or more members
  • play roles: a gorilla, a butler, a newscaster. The key here is to build interest without getting silly.
  • Dress up to fit your theme. One group wore tuxedos to demonstrate their "Night on the Town" theme.
  • Tie your theme into your presentation. If your event involves baseball, bring in a ball and bat and use analogies such as that you will "Hit a Home-Run" for the client.
  • Consider the pros and cons of PowerPoint. Multimedia presentations can add impact and entertain. But computers cannot replace creativity, and clients do not expect PowerPoint. If no one in your group has multimedia experience, it is better to use other types of visuals that you feel more confident about.


Go back to Dr. Randall Hansen's Integrated Marketing Communications Program (IMCP)